Home

Reading Matters blog -- latest post

Teenage girl becomes global backpacker. Okay, but ...

This is the seventh in a series of posts about novels for young readers that transport American characters into other cultures and countries. For suggesting Wanderlove, thanks to Carole Soden in Carpenteria, Ca. See my blog, Reading Matters, on this site for the full list of novels I'm reading.

Kirsten Hubbard’s Wanderlove is the story of an awkward, unconfident 18-year-old LA girl who, having been painfully discarded by an artist boyfriend, suppresses her own love for drawing and heads out alone on a trip the two had planned into Central America. Soon after, Bria ditches the tour group she’d signed on with and begins an unmapped adventure with a pair of young free-spirited backpackers — and then with just one, an enigmatic boy named Rowan.
           Over the course of more than 300 pages, Bria ... becomes cooler. Becomes a backpacker. Rediscovers her drawing talent, and ... well, as for the boy, what happens is not so hard to predict. Nor is the whole thing. It’s a nice enough romance/self-discovery story, even if the characters never fully come to life — and even though Bria, in visiting Guatemala and then a party-central island in Belize, never interacts with a local person who’s not serving her or selling to her. Obsessed with her own drama, she never learns a thing about the cultures she’s moving through. And that’s a little sad.
          I was a backpacker. I traveled and lived overseas for a good bit of my twenties, and I was also caught up in my own dramas and search for meaning and self — but I think I learned something about the people and places I encountered. Sure, most of the people I met and friends I made were fellow travelers, and sure, most of us gravitate toward people like ourselves; but the idea of backpacking travel is to reach past that. To push ourselves beyond ourselves and our small worlds.
          Bria never does. She idealizes backpackers, and Wanderlove does too. If that encourages more young people to open up and try the romance of traveling without a formal program or itinerary, that’s a good thing. Maybe a very good thing, in this era when we so much need to discover what’s beyond our own culture.
          But for the discovery itself — for popping the little, self-reflective bubbles we each carry around ... I would, I have to say, suggest looking elsewhere.

 

The Revealers has been the novel most used by U.S. middle schools. It's easy to see why.

REVEALERS front cover

A middle-school novel that deals realistically with bullying in a multi-character story, The Revealers has been the focus of reading-and-discussion projects in well over 1,000 middle schools. Here's an excerpt:

“People have really been doing things to him for years?”
    “Oh yeah. It’s always been open season on Elliot.”
    She shook her head. Her face was flushed. “And those two just ran away?”
    “Yeah. When they lost him and he fell, they got scared.”
    “They could have killed him.”
    “Well ... it wasn’t that far to fall.”
    “But he hit his head.”
    “Yeah.” I couldn’t argue with that. When we pulled Elliot out, his eyes were rolling back and he didn’t know where he was. He didn’t know who he was.

Download The Revealers in schools, a one-page pdf

The Revealers sequel opens up kids' struggles to become themselves in a hyper-linked world.

True Shoes cover 6-18-2013

from True Shoes:

When the doors opened, I’d just come through when someone grabbed my elbow. It was Cam; he spun me around and walked me back out. I said, “What are you doing?” — but he kept me going, gripping my elbow hard, until we were around a corner and no one else could see.    
    Cam had on a brown soldier’s t-shirt and desert-camouflage cargo pants. He yanked out his cell and flipped it open.
    He said, “You see this? I got it a few minutes ago.”
    “What?”
    He held his phone up, showing me the screen. His eyes were on fire.

Download True Shoes in schools, a one-page pdf

Download Novel Connections, a multimedia learning resource on cyberbullying and digital citizenship

"Picture a troubled teen quietly removing this book from the school library shelves, then sitting down ... and devouring it."*

Prince front cover high res

He pitched forward, and yanked me after him so hard I stumbled into a couple of high school guys, who put their hands out. “Whoa — easy, man,” they said, but I was already getting jerked pastthem, like a bad dog on a leash.
    He didn’t say a word, just kept this grip clamped on my arm as he stomped forward and hauled me along. People were jumping out of the way, everyone turning to look: high school kids, little kids staring with wide eyes, kids my age whispering and giggling, grownups drawing back with faces like masks.
    Tara was gone. Everything was gone. I was stumbling, stunned, seeing the faces in flashes and trying to keep my balance after every angry jerk on my arm. I tried to say something, but nothing came out. I couldn’t make words. I didn’t know any words except “Dad ... please,” and those I couldn’t say.

* from Foreword Reviews

Download “This important story invites honest discussion": Educators on The Prince of Denial"